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Waterhyacinth: Florida's Worst Floating Weed

Figure 1.  Inflorescence of waterhyacinth Credit: Lyn Gettys, UF/IFASWaterhyacinth is one of the world’s worst aquatic weeds and is Florida’s most intensively managed floating plant. Dense mats formed by this species interfere with human uses of water bodies and disrupt ecosystems by preventing penetration of light and oxygen into the water column. This attractive, free-floating aquatic plant grows throughout the year in southern Florida but often dies back during the winter in the northern parts of the state. Waterhyacinth is cultivated as a water garden and pond plant, but cultivation, sale, and possession of this noxious weed is prohibited in Florida. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Lyn A. Gettys, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag385

Eye-Tracking Methodology and Applications in Consumer Research

Example of eye tracking deviceEye-tracking technology is a means of exploring the relationship between visual attention and consumer behavior. In the past, eye-tracking technology has been used to conduct research on consumer decision-making, marketing, and advertising. This 5-page fact sheet serves as an introduction to eye-tracking technology and methodology. Written by Hayk Khachatryan and Alicia L. Rihn, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe947

Survival of Foodborne Pathogens on Berries

handfull of various berriesFresh and frozen berries are popular foods. When berries are picked for fresh consumption, they are usually packed directly without washing because they are highly perishable. There is typically no ?kill step? that would eliminate pathogens on fresh or frozen berries. Foodborne illness outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh or frozen berries that were contaminated with pathogenic viruses, parasites, or bacteria. Contamination can occur before or during harvest or during final preparation. This 11-page fact sheet was written by Mary Palumbo, Linda J. Harris, and Michelle D. Danyluk, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, November 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs236

Integrated Pest Management for Mosquito Reduction around Homes and Neighborhoods

Cover: Integrated Pest Management for Mosquito Reduction around Homes and NeighborhoodsThis 40-page publication describes how homeowners can use an integrated pest management (IPM) program to help decrease pesticide use, reduce the risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases, and ease the financial burden on local governments responsible for area-wide control. Modern mosquito control emphasizes source reduction to eliminate areas where mosquitoes thrive; surveillance to determine whether pesticide applications are necessary; screening; sanitation; and other techniques described in this document. The methods recommended in this publication are particularly effective in reducing mosquitoes that transmit diseases. Homeowners who take responsibility for identifying and eliminating sources of mosquito production around their homes and neighborhoods will improve health and quality of life for all Florida residents. Written by C. R. Connelly, E. Bolles, D. Culbert, J. DeValerio, M. Donahoe, K. Gabel, R. Jordi, J. McLaughlin, A. S. Neal, S. Scalera, E. Toro, and J. Walter, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1045

Budgets for Pasture Establishment: Seeded and Vegetative

ForageBudgets can be used to make rational decisions when establishing or renovating a pasture in Florida. This 3-page fact sheet is a guide for evaluating the costs of establishing a seeded-type pasture versus vegetatively propagated hybrid bermudagrasses. Written by Les Harrison, Jonael Bosques, and Yoana Newman, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, August 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag386

Peach Scab

Figure 3. Peach scab lesions on ripening fruit. Lesions occur on the top part of the fruit where water from rain or irrigation splashes spores down on the fruit.Peach scab is a disease caused by the fungus Cladosporium carpophilum. The pathogen can infect other fruits and nuts within the Prunus species, like almonds, apricots, nectarines, and plums. Peach scab is common during periods of humid weather because rain splashes the conidia (asexual spores) from the fungus between leaves, twigs, and fruit in the tree canopy, which spreads the disease. This 6-page fact sheet was written by Daniel Mancero-Castillo, Mercy Olmstead, and Phillip Harmon, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1249

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Pseudorabies

Figure 3. Hunting wild pigs with dogs dates back to the 14th century.Pseudorabies primarily affects swine, but cattle, sheep and other mammals are susceptible to infection. Humans are not at risk. The superficial symptoms of this viral disease resemble rabies symptoms, thus the name pseudorabies. Although eliminated in commercial animals, feral swine populations in the United States continue to circulate the disease and provide a reservoir for outbreaks. Texas, Oklahoma, Florida, and Hawaii all have dense populations of feral swine with a high prevalence of pseudorabies. Feral swine, therefore, pose a serious risk to commercial swine operations, livestock, companion animals, and wildlife. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Samantha Wisely, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, August 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw388

Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2010?2013

Peanut, row crops, palm tree, trees, Florida farm. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham.Variety choice is a critical management decision in producing a peanut crop. Since several good peanut varieties are available, it is essential to know each variety?s attributes and how different varieties might fit into a farm plan. This 7-page fact sheet provides data conducted from trials in Florida at UF/IFAS research centers located in Gainesville (Citra), Marianna, and Jay from 2010?2013. Written by Barry Tillman, Mark Gomillion, Justin McKinney, and George Person, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag382

Can Maternal Colostrum Be Replaced by Commercial Products for Feeding Newborn Calves?

dairy-calf-feeding Colostrum management and feeding are critical for calf health, calves? future productive life, and farm profitability. Current recommendations state that a calf needs to ingest at least 150?200 g of immunoglobulin G within two hours of birth, but when colostrum quality is poor or unavailable, colostrum replacer may be a suitable alternative. This 3-page fact sheet presents the results of a recent publication that evaluated the effects of feeding maternal colostrum, one dose of plasma-derived colostrum replacer, or one dose of colostrum-derived colostrum replacer on serum total protein, immunoglobulin G concentration, calf morbidity, calf mortality, and weight gain from birth to weaning. Written by Klibs N. Galvao, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm196

What Is the Most Cost-Effective Breeding Program for Lactating Dairy Cows: Timed AI, Estrous Detection, or a Combination of Both?

dairy-cowAs any other business enterprise, the sustainability of a dairy farm is highly dependent on economics. Reproduction influences both milk production and number of replacement heifers available on a farm; therefore, reproductive efficiency becomes a key determinant of dairy cow profitability. Several parameters affect reproductive performance. This 4-page fact sheet presents information from recently published articles that looked at the economics of different reproductive programs for breeding dairy cows that use estrus detection only, timed AI only, or a combination of both. Written by Klibs N. Galvão, Gustavo M. Schuenemann, Eduardo S. Ribeiro, and Jose Eduardo P. Santos, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm198

What Is the Most Cost-Effective Breeding Program for Breeding Heifers: Timed AI, Estrous Detection, or a Combination of Both?

e dairy cows wait patiently in line to give milk at the UF/IFAS Dairy Research Unit in Hague. Florida ranks first nationally in average herd size and 15th in milk income. Photo by Milt Putnam.As any other business enterprise, the sustainability of a dairy farm is highly dependent on economics. In order to obtain a profitable return on assets, there is a constant need to maximize outputs and, oftentimes, to minimize inputs. Reproduction influences both milk production and number of replacement heifers available on a farm; therefore, reproductive efficiency becomes a key determinant of dairy cow profitability. This 3-page fact sheet presents information from recently published work that looked at the economics of different reproductive programs for breeding heifers that use timed AI only, estrus detection only, or a combination of both. Written by Klibs N. Galvão, Eduardo S. Ribeiro, and Jose Eduardo P. Santos, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, May 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm199

Can GnRH Be Used to Induce Ovulation Early in Lactation and Improve Fertility in Dairy Cows?

Feeding dairy cows at the University of Florida's Dairy Research Unit in Hague, Florida. Bos taurus, dairy cattle, livestock, industry, DRU. UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones.It is well established that early cyclicity results in increased pregnancy per artificial insemination and decreased time to pregnancy. But none of the previous studies has used synchronization programs such as the Presynch-Ovsynch as part of their reproductive management. This 2-page fact sheet presents the results of a recent paper that evaluated the effects of administration of GnRH at 17 ± 3 and 20 ± 3 DIM in Holstein dairy cows without a corpus luteum (CL) on induction of ovulation, uterine health, and reproductive outcomes. Written by Klibs N. Galvão, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm201

Targeting ADG of Developing Replacement Heifers Using Age and Body Weight

North Florida beef cattle, pasture, field, calf. UF/IFAS Photo: Sally Lanigan.Heifer development continues to be one of the largest expenses to cow-calf operations, primarily due to cost of feed. Replacement heifers should be bred to calve at 24 months of age in order to maximize lifetime productivity of breeding females. Therefore, heifers should conceive at 15 months of age and achieve puberty at 13?14 months of age because heifers are infertile on the pubertal estrous cycle. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Phillip Lancaster and Cliff Lamb, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an305

Pests and Fungal Organisms Identified on Olives (Olea europaea) in Florida

Figure 1. Leaffooted bug, Leptoglossus phyllopus, on an olive tree in Marion County, Florida.Olive production in Florida has increased over the last few years. As trees become available in nurseries many homeowners are planting them in their landscapes. Fortunately, olives are a relatively pest-free species, but some occasional invaders can be a nuisance or cause lasting harm. A few plant pathogens that may infect olives also can lead to a decline in overall plant health, fruit yield, or the visual appearance of plants. Following correct cultural practices when growing olives can reduce your chances of tree loss from pests and diseases. A survey of olive production and interviews with Florida growers in 2014 identified the pests and diseases described in this 5-page fact sheet, written by Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman, Sandra A. Allan, Jonael H. Bosques-Mendez, and Lyle J. Buss, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1046

Florida Nursery Crops and Landscaping Industry Economic Impacts, Situation, and Outlook

Greenhouse with large variety of cultivated flowers.Florida is one of the leading environmental horticulture producers in the United States, ranked second only to California. In 2010, total industry sales were estimated at $12.33 billion. This 10-page report summarizes the current situation, economic impacts, and outlook for the environmental horticulture industry in Florida. Written by Hayk Khachatryan and Alan W. Hodges, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe946

When Should We Stop Breeding Dairy Cows?

vm200The decision of when to start and when to stop breeding cows during a lactation is often a challenging one for dairy producers. This 3-page fact sheet presents practical rules on how to determine when to stop breeding Holstein dairy cows based on persistency of milk production and break-even point for milk production. Written by Klibs N. Galvão and Albert De Vries, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm202

Should You Breed Cows during the Summer in the Southeastern United States? An Economic Analysis of a Dairy Herd in Florida

dairy-cowIn the southeast United States, since dairy cows experience decreased reproductive performance during the hot and humid summers, some dairy farmers delay breeding until the cooler fall. But there is no economic data to support this practice. This 3-page fact sheet presents the results of a recent paper that evaluated the effects that delaying breeding during the summer has on cow performance and profitability in Florida. Written by Klibs N. Galvão and Albert De Vries, and published by the UF Department of Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences, July 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm195

Costs and Benefits of More Efficient Irrigation Systems for Florida Chipping Potato Production

potatoesThe goal of this 11-page fact sheet is to help producers and other interested parties understand how alternative irrigation systems can affect economic outcomes in agricultural operations. We used chipping potato production in the Hastings area in northeast Florida as an example to discuss factors to consider when selecting an irrigation system. Written by Jenna Rogers, Tatiana Borisova, Lincoln Zotarelli, Kelly Grogan, Jeffrey Ullman, Jessica Bertine, and Kelly Morgan, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe953

How to Start a Food Business: Introduction

Farmer's MarketWhile running your own food business can be a rewarding and exciting experience, it can be overwhelming and stressful. It is important to understand the pros and cons of running your own food business and decide if you are ready to pursue a food business venture. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Soohyoun Ahn, Renee Goodrich-Schneider, and Amarat H. Simonne, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs254

Pavement ant Tetramorium caespitum (Linnaeus) (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Figure 1.  A) Parallel rugae (ridges) running lengthwise on head. B) Antennae with 12 segments (dots representing each segment). C) Characteristic raised ridge at the antennal insertion. D) Antennal club 3-segmented. The pavement ant is one of the most commonly encountered ants in the United States. Since first introduced from Europe at the beginning of the nineteenth century, the ant has become well established and is prevalent in urban areas in the northern U.S. and parts of Canada. However, the extent of their invasiveness and severity as a pest is not well characterized. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Tyler Vitone and Andrea Lucky, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1047


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