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Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Its Relation to Learning and Achievement

Figure 1. Maslow's Hierarchy of NeedsLearners in courses or training can be preoccupied. They worry about other courses, their home life, friends, extracurricular activities, physiological needs like food and sleep, and the list goes on. When learners are preoccupied with these concerns, learning and achievement are regularly put on the back burner. So how do we get our learners to focus on learning? Instructors can help learners satisfy needs, so the focus can be on content, learning, and achievement. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Sarah E. Burleson and Andrew C. Thoron, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc159

Using Social Norms to Increase Behavior Change in Sustainable Landscaping

Figure 1.  A graphic representation of the social marketing approach as applied to Extension programming. Adapted from McKenzie-Mohr, 2011.When Extension agents work to encourage behavioral changes in their community through educational programming, they may already be using some elements of social marketing. Extension educators can use an understanding of their clients’ reservations and inclinations toward a behavior, or their benefits and barriers, to develop strategies that encourage behavior change. Common strategies include prompts and reminders, incentives, and changing social norms. These strategies may be piloted on a small scale, modified if necessary, and then implemented on a large scale and further evaluated. This publication?s purpose is to describe the use of social norms as a social marketing strategy and make recommendations for applying social norms as a tool in Extension programming. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Laura Sanagorski and Paul Monaghan , and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc158

It's Bug Week! Try our Butterfly Personality Quiz

Girl in butterfly costume What’s your butterfly personality? Florida enjoys a diversity of Lepidoptera — butterflies and moths. Take this quiz to find out which is your match! Follow the link to learn more about your butterfly on EDIS. Don’t forget to share your results on Facebook and Twitter using hashtag #UFBugs!
http://bit.ly/1jMrpR4

Raising Healthy Children: Age Four

Figure 3. A bike ride with your child is great way to show him or her how to lead an active lifestyle.As children continue their preschool years, they learn many new things and develop their own opinions and ideas. During this time, people inside and outside of the home may greatly influence them. As preschoolers continue to learn and grow, caregivers can take many steps to guide their children in a healthy and positive direction. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Kate Bennet, Gail Kauwell, and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1398

Roystonea regia: Royal Palm

Figure 1. Royal palm (Roystonea regia)The royal palm is a large majestic palm that is native to south Florida and Cuba. It is considered cold hardy to about 28F or USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 10A. This species quickly grows to heights of 50?70 ft., with a spread of 20?25 ft., and has a smooth light gray trunk up to 2 ft. in diameter. It is ideal for landscaping streets, parks, and commercial properties, but becomes too large for typical residential landscapes. This 4-page fact sheet was written by T.K. Broschat, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st574

Livistona chinensis: Chinese Fan Palm

Figure 1. Chinese fan palm showing full round canopy of green leaves and retention of dead leaves below.The Chinese fan palm is relatively slow growing, typically reaching about 30 feet in height. Its fan-shaped, costapalmate leaves can be 3 to 4 feet across and up to 6 feet long. Petioles of juvenile palms are spiny, but have few or no spines in adult palms. Because of its gracefully drooping leaf segment tips, this species is sometimes called the “fountain palm”. Young specimens are slow to form a trunk, which has led to the unfortunate practice of planting these palms close together as a ground cover. Eventually, most of those closely planted palms will have to be removed to accommodate their 10 to 12 foot spread. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Timothy K. Broschat, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st365

2013 Evaluation of Non-Irrigated Early-Maturing Cotton Varieties in Jay, Florida

Figure 1.  Cotton Variety Trial in Jay, Florida This report includes a summary of the 2013 early-season cotton Official Variety Trial in Jay, Florida. It shows the performance of 11 cotton varieties. This data represents only one year and one location, and readers are cautioned that test results should be considered over several locations and years before final conclusions are valid. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Darcy Telenko and Michael Donahoe , and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag378

Spreading Dayflower Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Spreading dayflower. Spreading dayflower (Commelina diffusa) is a succulent annual that produces freely branched smooth stems. Leaves are broadly lance-shaped with closed sheaths. Sheaths are short with a few soft hairs on the upper margin. Flowers have three blue petals in a leaf-like structure open on the margins. Reproduction occurs via seed and stem fragments. This 2-page fact sheet was written by J. Bryan Unruh, Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, and Ramon Leon, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep497

Violet Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Violet in grassViolets (Viola spp.) are diverse winter annuals and perennials. Perennials form rhizomes or long stolons. Many have heart-shaped leaves on long petioles and have a rosette growth habit. Some have linear leaves and others have palmate leaves. Flowers are generally purple, but can be white, pink or yellow. They reproduce by seed or, when produced, rhizomes. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Darcy E. P. Telenko, Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, and J. Bryan Unruh, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep496

Aster leafminer moth Leucospilapteryx venustella (Clemens) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae)

Figure 1. Adult resting posture of Leucospilapteryx venustella (Clemens).  Leucospilapteryx venustella (Clemens) (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) is a small, mostly light brown moth that during its larval stages creates mines in the leaves of plants in the family Asteraceae. Feeding damage by the early instars is characterized by serpentine mines that are expanded by later instars to form tentiform or blotch mines. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Rodrigo Diaz, Esteban Tapia, Veronica Manrique, William Overholt, and Donald Davis, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1029

Goat Parasite Control: General Guidelines

Figure 1. Use mucous membrane colors as an indication of anemia.  Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitism is the leading cause of death and decreased production in goats. At least 48% of farms in the southeast have parasites that are resistant to all classes of dewormers. While there is no one-size-fits-all recommendation for parasite control, the information in this fact sheet is provided for on-farm use. Contact your veterinarian for specific recommendations. Information was provided by Dr. Sarah Reuss of the UF Large Animal Medicine Service. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Sarah Reuss, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an294

Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Figure 1. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, collecting nectar from a flower.Protecting honey bees and other pollinators from pesticide impacts is important to the sustainability of agriculture. Consequently, pesticide applicators must determine if there is a clear hazard to managed or wild populations of bees. Potential exposure of bees to pesticides can vary greatly depending on the type of pesticide, formulation, application method, label restrictions, and other factors. The goal in using a pesticide is to achieve maximum benefit (success) with minimum negative impact, and these factors should always be considered in pesticide selection. This publication is written (1) to help assure the sustainability of both bees and agriculture by informing beekeepers, pesticide users, and the general public about the often complex relationship between pollinators (specifically bees) and pesticides, (2) to offer guidance for improved communication between beekeepers and pesticide users, (3) to offer pollinator risk-reducing strategies for growers and other applicators when using pesticides, and (4) to provide clarity in laws, labeling, and associated definitions. This 14-page fact sheet was written by J. D. Ellis, J. Klopchin, E. Buss, F. M. Fishel, W. H. Kern, C. Mannion, E. McAvoy, L. S. Osborne, M. Rogers, M. Sanford, H. Smith, P. Stansly, L. Stelinski, and S. Webb, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1027

Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) for Citrus Trees

Figure 1.  Iron deficiency symptomsSince mineral nutrition is a major factor in maximizing yield of high-quality fruit, understanding the functions of mineral elements, diagnosing nutrient deficiencies, and providing needed fertilizers are essential. This publication describes and discusses iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) deficiencies, functions, and recommended practices to alleviate nutritional problems. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Mongi Zekri and Tom Obreza, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss617

Manganese (Mn) and Zinc (Zn) for Citrus Trees

Figure 1.  Manganese deficiency symptomsSince mineral nutrition is a major factor in maximizing yield of high-quality fruit, understanding the functions of mineral elements, diagnosing nutrient deficiencies, and providing needed fertilizers are essential. This publication describes and discusses manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies, functions, and recommended practices to alleviate nutritional problems. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Mongi Zekri and Tom Obreza , and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss616

Como hacer una trampa interceptora de chinches de cama de articulos comunes del hogar.

Figure 10. Interceptor trap placed under the leg of a piece of furniture.Las chinches de cama se han convertido en un problema de plagas cada vez más común en los Estados Unidos. Se han encontrado en muchos lugares diferentes en donde vive la gente, desde escuelas y restaurantes a consultorios médicos y salas de cine, pero las peores infestaciones son por lo general en lugares donde vive la gente, descansan y duermen como en casas, pisos, apartamentos, hoteles y refugios para desamparados. Las chinches de cama son más comunes en lugares como alrededor de piezas de mobiliario en donde la gente se sienta o acuesta- camas, sillas y sofás. Para descubrir si las chiches están presentes en una habitación o un mueble, el dispositivo llamado trampa interceptora de chinches puede ser útil. Las trampas interceptoras atrapan y recogen las chinches de cama cuando tratan de viajar entre sus huéspedes humanos y sus escondites. Las trampas interceptoras de chinches de cama son fácilmente hechas de artículos del hogar y recipientes de plástico desechables. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Benjamin A. Hottel, Rebecca W. Baldwin, Roberto M. Pereira, and Philip G. Koehler, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1026

Black Medic Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1.  Black medic Black medic (Medicago lupulina) is a dark green annual with spreading, prostrate growth. Leaves are alternate with three leaflets on square stems. Leaflets are obovate to elliptic, toothed near the tip, and have a small spur on the tip. Bright yellow flowers are produced in tight, compressed clusters at leaf axils. Reproduction occurs via seed in tightly coiled black seed pods. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and Darcy E. P. Telenko, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep494

Sedge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Purple nutsedge Members of the sedge family have leaves that are composed of a blade, sheath, and ligule. The leaf sheath is closed and the ligule is often absent, and when present is tiny. Stem structure is often triangular.This 3-page fact sheet was written by D. E. P. Telenko, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and B. J. Brecke, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep492

Effect of Fertilizer Phosphorus Rate of Tomato and Green Bean Yield and Growth in High pH Sandy Soils of South Florida

tomato harvestThis 4-page fact sheet addresses the effect of phosphorus rate on tomato and green bean yield and growth in high pH soils and discusses their relationship to both nutrition and fertilizer management. Written by Kelly T. Morgan and Kamal Mahmoud, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss611

How to Calculate a Partial Nitrogen Mass Budget for Potato

Figure 1.  Center pivot irrigated potato in Florida.This 6-page fact sheet provides information on the importance of nitrogen budgets for potato cultivation and discusses the steps in preparing the budget. It allows growers to understand the inputs, cycling, and exports of nutrients within and away from the farm, develop a nutrient budget, and analyze best management practices (BMPs) for their farm. The results will be increased N fertilizer use efficiency, increased environmental protection, and reduced economic losses associated with potato cultivation. This document will also aid county agents, environmental management advisors, and government agency staff members who help farmers improve and implement nutrient BMPs to protect water quality. Written by Rishi Prasad and George Hochmuth, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss614

Effect of Reduced Soil pH with Sulfur on Available Soil Phosphorus in High pH Sandy Soils of South Florida

bean pickerThis 3-page fact sheet addresses the effect of moderating soil pH by using sulfur amendments in high pH soils and discusses their relationship to both nutrition and fertilizer management. Written by Kelly T. Morgan and Kamal Mahmoud, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss612


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