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Smutgrass Control in Perennial Grass Pastures

Figure 1. Smutgrass infestations are common in bahiagrass pastures throughout Florida. Smutgrass is a serious weed of improved perennial grass pastures, roadsides, natural areas, and waste areas in Florida. A 2003 survey found that smutgrass was second only to tropical soda apple as the most problematic weed species in Florida pastures, but now that practices to control tropical soda apple have been widely adopted in Florida, smutgrass is likely the most problematic weed species in Florida pastures today. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Brent Sellers, J. A. Ferrell, and J. J. Mullahey, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2014. (Photo Credit: B. Sellers, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa261

Healthy Living: Checking Blood Glucose

Figure 1.  A blood glucose meter (or glucometer) uses a tiny drop of blood to test your blood glucose level.Checking your blood glucose levels is an important part of managing diabetes. Your blood glucose values let you know how well your care plan is working and if you need to make any changes. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Jennifer Hillan and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, February 2014.(Photo iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy868

Conservation Subdivision: Post-construction Phase: Policy Directions and the Importance of Assessing Stakeholder Opinions

Figure 1. A dragonfly using an urban habitat patch in Gainesville, FL.Simply designating open space in a development is not enough to provide long-term protection for a variety of wildlife. New policies need to be developed that encourage developers of conservation developments to adopt long-term management practices that support biodiversity conservation. This 5-page fact sheet discusses policy options that could be used to support conservation management practices and reports on a survey of Colorado landowners who have created conservation developments and their opinions about a policy option to support the implementation of management practices. Written by Daniel Feinberg and Mark Hostetler, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo credit: Daniel Feinberg)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw401

Howea forsteriana: Kentia Palm

Figure 1. Mature kentia palm in the landscape.The kentia palm is considered one of the best interior palms for its durability and elegant appearance. The dark green graceful crown of up to three dozen leaves gives it a tropical appearance. Containerized palms can be used on a deck or patio in a shady location or the palm can be planted into the landscape.This 3-page fact sheet was written by Samar Shawaqfeh and Timothy Broschat, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2014. (Photo credit: T. K. Broschat)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st297

Urban Pests and Pest Management

Figure 1. This fact sheet is excerpted from SP486: Pests in and around the Southern Home, which is available from the UF/IFAS Extension Bookstore. http://ifasbooks.ifas.ufl.edu/p-1222-pests-in-and-around-the-southern-home.aspxThe warm southern states provide an ideal environment for a wide variety of pests — and because almost everyone has problems with pests, most urban areas are sprayed with pesticides. 30 to 40 percent of pesticide use is in urban areas, but most pesticide applications are unnecessary and can result in environmental contamination and human exposure to pesticides. This 5-page fact sheet from Pests in and around the Southern Home introduces integrated pest management practices that can help reduce pesticide use in the home. Written by P.G. Koehler, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1073

Ten Strategies for Working With Your Home Owner Association to Convert to a Florida-Friendly Yard

Figure 13. Example of an image that clearly shows plant material.Many homeowners are beginning to rethink their landscapes for several reasons, including mandated water and fertilizer restrictions, increasing maintenance costs, and concern for the environment. But over sixty million people now live in neighborhoods governed by Homeowner Associations, whose regulations can make it difficult to implement some changes by mandating types of plants, percentages of turf and plant material, location of plant materials, and restricting specialty gardens to back yards. More environmentally sound landscapes are possible with careful planning and design and by using an educated and knowledgeable approach to working with the HOA board to gain approval for a new landscape. This 9-page fact sheet offers several strategies for working within HOA regulations to gain approval for a Florida-Friendly landscape. Written by Gail Hansen and Claire Lewis, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2014. (Photo credit: Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Program)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep513

Plant Connections Member's Manual

Figure 1. Plants are a very important part of our ecosystemThe Kids Growing with Plant Connections Youth Workbook (4H194/4H PSM 11) is aimed at educating youth about the basics of horticulture. Youth will be exposed to information on plants and the plant kingdom. Lessons include: What Is a Plant?–Why Are Plants Important?–What Makes Plants Grow?–How to Grow Plants–How to Select and Handle Plants. The Plant Connections Leader’s Guide (4H192/4H PSL 21) is used in conjunction with this youth workbook. This 25-page workbook was written by Janice Easton and Deborah J. Glauer, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h194

Kids Growing with Plant Connections Leader's Guide (4H PSL 21)

youth in his garden with leaderThis 195-page curriculum guide is aimed at educating youth about the basics of horticulture. Youth will be exposed to information on plants and the plant kingdom. Written by Janice Easton and Deborah J. Glauer, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, January 2014.

Single PDF:http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h192
Individual Chapters:

Biology and Management of Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Eclipta growth in a mulched landscape bed. Note the purplish stems, lanceolate leaves, and prostrate growth habit.Eclipta grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. Plants flower in as little as five weeks after germination and produce thousands of seeds over the course of a growing season, and stem fragments left on the soil or media surface following hand-weeding or cultivation can root and reproduce vegetatively. This 4-page fact sheet describes the plant, its biology, and recommendations for physical, cultural, and chemical control. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2014. (Photo: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep512

Shopping for Health: Snack Foods

Home made crispy kale chipsAt first glance, you might think that snacking should be avoided because of the extra calories they can add to your diet. However, studies have shown there may be benefits when healthy snack choices are made. Read this 4-page fact sheet to learn about the benefits of healthy snacks and to learn healthy snack shopping tips. Includes recipes for homemade crispy kale chips and peanut butter and jelly yogurt. Written by Carley Rusch and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2014. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs262

Ecosystem Services Valuation for Estuarine and Coastal Restoration in Florida

A canal close to the beach in Naples, Florida.Throughout Florida’s history, humans have altered the coastlines, leading to large-scale degradation of coastal ecosystems. This has led to the loss of associated ecosystem services, including products such as food and timber and processes like coastal protection and disease control. Unfortunately, ecosystem restoration efforts have not always been a priority for coastal management. This 10-page literature review surveys the available ecosystem-service valuation literature for five of Florida’s coastal natural communities–oyster reefs, beach dunes, mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and salt marshes–to facilitate the quantification of ecosystem services to provide a better measure of the full impact of restoration efforts. Written by Susanna Blair, Carrie Adams, Tom Ankersen, Maia McGuire, and David Kaplan, and published by the UF Department of Sea Grant, November 2014. (UF/IFAS photo by Tyler Jones)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg134

Biology and Management of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsute) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Bittercress with clumping growth habit in loropetalum cuttings. Credit: Chris Marble Bittercress commonly grows in the potting media of container-grown ornamentals and often through drainage holes in nursery containers. It also can be a problem in propagation houses, greenhouses, and in the field. This 6-page fact sheet provides species description, plant biology, and management recommendations. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep511

Control of Rapid Postharvest Decays of Tomato Fruit

Figure 11. Fruit picked during a rain shower and then dye added to wet stem scar. What is a rapid postharvest decay? Water-soaked lesions begin within 12 to 18 hours after harvest and continue to develop, producing large amounts of fluids. The decay spreads within cartons of tomatoes, producing wet patches in the bottom and sides of the container, a condition called “wet-boxes.” Affected fruit are out-of-grade either prior to shipment or upon arrival at the receiver.This 5-page fact sheet was written by J. A. Bartz, S. A. Sargent, and D. J. Huber, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, December 2014. (Photo: S. R. Bartz)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs363

Shopping for Health: Seafood

grilled salmon on fresh greensSeafood is part of the protein foods group of MyPlate and also provides other nutrients needed for good health. Because of the many health benefits, adults should consume at least eight ounces of a variety of seafood every week. Still, it is important to consider your budget when shopping for seafood. This 4-page fact sheet explains the health benefits of seafood and offers some money-saving strategies for making seafood more affordable. Written by Michelle Brown and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, April 2014. (Photo: Elena Gaak/iStock/Thinkstock)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs247

Conducting Interviews for News Stories

Reporter interviewing soldierIn order to write a good news story for print, television, or radio, you have to conduct interviews with the people who have the information you need. An interview is the process of asking good questions so you can get good answers for your news story. This 3-page fact sheet provides some tips to follow as you conduct a news story interview. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2014. (Photo: VStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc194

News Writing for Television and Radio

Figure 1. UF/IFAS video shoot for Gardening in a MinuteCreating a television or radio story is more than hitting “record” on a video camera or audio recorder. You have to learn the process of writing an effective television and radio news story first. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc193

Grammar and Punctuation

Hand with Red Pen Proofreading Text CloseupAny news story should be as free of grammar and punctuation errors as possible. Grammar is a system of rules that defines the use of the language. Most of the grammar and punctuation rules you have learned in school will be the same when using Associated Press Style, but there are some differences. This 4-page fact sheet covers some common grammatical and punctuation issues for journalists. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2014. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc192

News Writing for Print

inverted pyramid structureA good print news story will contain the following components: inverted pyramid structure, five Ws and H, leads, impersonal reporting, news writing techniques, quotations and attributions, Associated Press Style, and proper grammar and punctuation. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc191

News Media Writing

Figure 1. ScriptwritingKnowing how to write in a news media style is important not only for an organization’s reporters, but also for its members. This 2-page fact sheet provides an overview of news writing for print, television, and radio to help you better communicate news about what is going on in your organization. Written by Ricky Telg, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc190

The Invasion Curve: A Tool for Understanding Invasive Species Management in South Florida

Figure 1. The invasion curve. Adapted from Invasive Plants and Animals Policy Framework, State of Victoria, Department of Primary Industries, 2010.South Florida has more than its share of invasive plants, reptiles, amphibians, fish, mammals, birds, and invertebrates. Nonnative species often spread quickly. Research and monitoring can help managers anticipate which species will cause harm before it is too late to remove them. Identifying where a species is on the invasion curve is the first step to taking management action. The invasion curve shows that eradication of an invasive species becomes less likely and control costs increase as an invasive species spreads over time. Prevention is the most cost-effective solution, followed by eradication. If a species is not detected and removed early, intense and long-term control efforts will be unavoidable. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Rebecca G. Harvey and Frank J. Mazzotti, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, November 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw392


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Annual Statistics for 2014 reports will be available November 17th. More...

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